Tarantula bits #6

100_7122

New shelving going to be needed soonish.

Rehousing Poecilotheria(s). [Indian ornamental tarantulas.]

Just a quick post with some pics of today’s adventures in rehousing a Poecilotheria regalis and a P. miranda.

The P. regalis was fun as it decided to explore the bathtub wall tile, but was easily catch cupped. Tarantulas roll in spurts, and the trick is to let em’ stop before trying to recapture.

The P. miranda on the other hand, waltzed gracefully from the old house to the cup to the new house.

This is the time that I’ve been expecting. Quite a few of my collection are growin’ up, and require better (bigger) accommodations.  In the next week, I will have to rehouse seven tarantulas, some arboreal, some terrestrial and one that can’t make up its mind whether it is one or the other. Heh.

A quick note on the large enclosure. A “bugarium” as is mentioned in the pictures is a Zoomed product. A surprisingly inexpensive 8 x 8 x 11″ terrarium of glass construction with a removable top. I custom built the top with acrylic and four 2″ round vents, leaving one of these loose to easily feed and water without major disruption for the tarantula. A rock weight keeps things from becoming accidentally “interesting”.   I am very…VERY pleased with this product, and will be using it to house quite a few more specimens going forward. While this doesn’t have “cross-ventilation”,  it is ‘airy’, and most adult tarantulas don’t need a breeze to thrive. Another positive for me with these is the uniform appearance. It will be quite simple to shelve these cubes for display without a lot of odd sized enclosures making things look cluttered.

Anyway, here’s the process of rehouse in pictures: (Click the coffee cup for the slideshow and captions.)

 

Poll – Was Your First Tarantula a “Beginner Species”?

A poll from Tom’s Big Spider Blog about which type of species you started with.

Tom's Big Spiders

If I could get just a moment of your time …

This is going to be a short and sweet blog post. Although I’m working on an article that the results of this poll would be really useful for, this question comes more from curiosity.

How many of you in the hobby began with a “beginner species?”

For the sake of argument, let consider the following a “beginner species.”

All Aphonopelma, Brachypelma, and Grammostola species, C. cyaneopubescens (GBB), Avicularia avicularia or metallica, Lasiodora parahybana (LP), E. capestratus, and Euathlus species.

And, for the more “advanced” species, let’s go with:

All “baboon” species, Pamphobeteus species, Phormictopus species, Nhandu species, Acanthoscurria species, Hapalopus species, Tapinauchenius species, Psalmopoeus species, and Poecilotheria species, and any other “Old World” tarantula not listed above.

If you’re not sure where yours falls, please take a moment to put it in the comment section.

View original post 55 more words

Tarantula bits #5

100_5253

Pterinochilus murinus watching TV.

This ‘bits’ is going to focus on the Pterinochilus murinus (OBT) as one of the most interesting and easy to care for Tarantulas in the hobby.

After watching and re-reading Tom’s Big Spiders article on the “best beginner tarantulas”, I teased him a bit with a few of the more “advanced” species that sometimes end up as a beginner T-Keeper’s charges. This of course got me to pondering the age-old debate about the OBT, and thus this post.

Continue reading

The Best Tarantula Species For Beginners Revisited (Video Version)

A video update to Tom’s Big Spider “best beginners article. Well worth the read..and now the watch! 🙂

Tom's Big Spiders

“What is the best tarantulas species for a beginner?”

I’ve spent a lot of time answering this question over the years, and for those just dipping their toe into this amazing hobby, it’s an excellent and important question to ask. Several year ago, I wrote my article “The Best Tarantula Species for Beginners” in which I detailed the species I thought make excellent first tarantulas for someone just starting out. In this first version, I included only species I kept and cared for so that I could share my own experiences and anecdotes on them.  To be truthful, my opinions on some of the species (I’m looking at you A. chalcodes, A. avicularia, and B. vagans!) have changed over the years, so I’ve continued to periodically revise the original text to jigger the order and to add new species deserving of the title. With the post nearing 50,000…

View original post 1,003 more words

The Tarantula molt process, or how to become a virgin again.

100_6228

Brachypelma smithi in her old clothes

This would have been a “tarantula bits” post, except I liked the title, so hey.

Last night my Brachypelma smithi, a purchase from a local Petco, molted, and Tom Moran posted up a Grammostola iheringi update where the molt had just occurred with one of his 8-legged cats.
SYNCRONICITY!   heh heh.

I had photo-documented the process with my B. smithi, so I figured I’d post up about the how, what and whyfores with some most excellent shots to illustrate just how Tarantulas “do”.

One of the interesting facets of the exotic pet hobby (not JUST tarantulas) is the molting process. Reptiles shed, as well as snakes, and almost all inverts as well.

[aside: This includes all of the sea-abiding cousins such as this kid here:]

14444737_10207443930511585_7952349510221565930_o

Continue reading

Vendor Review: PetcenterUSA

100_6244

Just a quick review of an already respected Tarantula vendor who does retail and wholesale work.

Paul Becker has been in the 8-legged cat game for a long time, and with good reason.

I’m not going to go into screaming detail, as these things have been done many times via social media, (A good overview here from Tom’s Big Spider Blog)  but as I am 100% pleased with the selection, service and health of the specimens I just received, here’s the post!

Packaging = perfect.

Continue reading

A little reef life

 

IMG_20160214_010213086

Aquarium update!

The 20 long tank is maturing and becoming much easier to maintenance. (Meaning other than weekly water changes and checking water parameters once a month, the tank has fully stabilized and can accommodate more demanding species .)

The biggest change to the tank has been the upgrade to a COB led lighting system. COB= Chip on Board. This is a newer technology combining a lot of small LEDs onto a single plate with reflectors and lenses to increase the light’s efficiency and spread.  I’m really REALLY happy with this, as it allows me to control the light via wifi, and set up a “ramping” schedule which mimics morning-day-evening-night unattended.

IMG_20160130_032202488

 

The 10 gallon pico is also maturing. I’m dealing with a couple spots of cyanobacteria (red slime) due to a flow issue (meaning that the water flow is missing a couple of areas which then become stagnant, allowing organic material to let the bacteria colonize.) Easily managed, and all part of the hobby at one point or other.

IMG_20160110_151056 (1)

 

In the gallery, other than one photo-bomb, this is specifically a coral update. Fish and such will get their own post shortly. 🙂

This gallery updates and gives a glimpse into the aquatic world that sits on the other side of my arachnid world.

To view, just click the first picture in the gallery and…

Enjoy!